Cover Image by Jessica Buie, From the series Exposure, 2017

Content | Issue #1


  • Silence
    Beau Bertens
  • Luxury Advertisements
    A March Issue
  • Opening Up Fashion As A
    Practice of Commoning
    Danielle Bruggeman
  • Pulp
    Aimée Zito Lema & Elisa van Joolen
  • KLARA BARBARA I
    Maria Kley
  • THE GARMENT AS A SET OF SHAPES
    JOIN Collective Clothes
  • WARDROBE FILLED WITH
    EVERYTHING AND NOTHING
    Johannes Reponen
  • KIDS IN FASHION
    Adele Varcoe & Collaborators
  • FASHION DWELLS
    INTELLECTUALLY
    Colby Vexler & Justin Clemens

  • ARTICLES OF CLOTHING IN
    THREE SCENES Badminton,
    the garden and the workshop
    Annie Wu, Agnieszka Chabros
    & Amelia Winata
  • Exposure
    Jessica Buie
  • THE LUXURY MAGAZINE
    AS DISCIPLINARY AGENT
    Towards a fashion system
    where bodies make meaning
    Chet Bugter
  • FREEDON (AND ON AND ON)
    Shanzhai Lyric
  • MACHINE LEARNING CLOTHING
    The Fashion-MNIST dataset
    Rowan McNaught & Laura Gardner
  • Tag
    Storage Solutions
  • “TO BE HONEST WITH YOU”
    Femke de Vries

From luxury characterised as uniqueness created by lowly and anonymous artisans in pre-democratic times, to made-to-measure haute couture and the cult of the star designer at the end of the 19th century, from the merging of mass market and prestige into ‘masstige’ (a term coined by Karl Lagerfeld, introducing his H&M collaboration in 2004) to the hunger for street credibility by luxury fashion houses causing them to sell 2000 euro hoodies, and from the conspicuous consumption showcased on Instagram to the explosion of wellness and self-care culture; luxury has had many faces over the past few decades.

Among a new generation of fashion designers, researchers, writers and curators, very different views on luxury, and fashion in general, exist. Motivated by the sorry state of the current fashion system and its exploitative labour practices, environmental pollution, depletion of resources and exclusionary marketing language among other things, this generation is not only critiquing the system, its individualistic approach and its limiting views on the concept of luxury (among other things), but also seeking to create alternative, more inclusive ways of defining luxury. In this issue of , we give voice to these new ideas and propositions on contemporary luxury and its material and immaterial characteristics.

These new imaginations on luxury show a radical departure from the classical interpretation of the concept; a concept that is firmly rooted in the idea that luxury is above all about abundance and indulgence, and therefore is not absolutely necessary, but a privilege for the happy few. But what actually is a ‘necessity’ in contemporary society, and what do we define as ‘abundance’? In the context of late capitalism and its inequities and growing political polarization, the ideas on what luxury constitutes are rapidly shifting. Self-care is making way for a collective form of care: for creating together, performing together, learning together, regaining agency together.

In this issue of , you’ll find the views of our contributors on the meaning of ‘luxury’ in the context of today’s and tomorrow’s fashion world and society at large. We aim to show a plurality of perspectives, but all seem to have its root in the common understanding that change is required, not just within the fashion industry, but beyond. And as fashion can be regarded as a social practice – something we all participate in – why not start here?

Cover Image by Tenant of Culture, From the series Fluo, Flames, Camouflage, 2016

Content | Issue #0


  • Shopping
    Beau Bertens
  • Fashioning Streets with
    Give and Take
    Johannes Reponen
  • Breaking through the Façade:
    Collective critique on fashion in the 1990s
    Laura Gardner
  • No Sugar Coating allowed
    an interview with Camiel Fortgens
    by Renee van der Hoek
  • The Extras
    D&K (Ricarda Bigolin)
  • On the streets of South Africa
    Duran Lantink
  • Ethics Synthetics
    AVOIDSTREET
  • The rag-pickers discourse
    A selected guide by Tenant of Culture
  • Lost and Collected
    Ruby Hoette

  • Street fashion, self-defence,
    fearless
    Femke de Vries
  • one–to–one (r. Mariz)
    Elisa van Joolen

For its inaugural issue, reflects on the relation between fashion and the street, as the street has always played a pivotal – but ever-changing – role in the generation, presentation and perpetuation of fashion. A short overview of the content:

Beau Bertens researches the impact of visual language on the street by deconstructing the shopping bag and examining its rhetoric power by placing it in an editorial context, Johannes Reponen critically examines concepts of ‘street style’ and ‘streetwear’, Laura Gardner writes about how 90s art groups such as Art Club 2000, Honey-Suckle Company and Bernadette Corporation presented a critique of the institutions of fashion through the concept of ‘collectivity’, Renee van der Hoek discusses with Camiel Fortgens how to find one’s place within a changing fashion system, Ricarda Bigolin of D&K explores the slippages between workwear, streetwear and branding in the context of current high end and luxury fashion practices, Duran Lantink shows his daily observations from the streets of South Africa, the urban tales of streetwear brand AVOIDSTREET are imagined in an advertorial, Tenant of Culture reflects on narratives surrounding waste in fashion, Ruby Hoette documents items of clothing found in public spaces, reflecting on concepts inherent to the current fashion system such as newness, brand value versus material quality and uniqueness, Femke de Vries constructs a fashion column, and Elisa van Joolen proposes an alternative fashion editorial that shows the material properties of clothes by Dutch streetwear labels Bonne Suits, By Parra, Ontour and Patta with the precision of an X-ray vision.